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Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear
Poems, Songs, Limericks and Stories.
 Biography
Lear was born into a middle-class family in Highgate, the 20th child of Ann and Jeremiah Lear. He was raised by his eldest sister, also named Ann, 21 years his senior. Due to the family's failing financial fortune, at age four he and his sister had to leave the family home and set up house together. He started work as a serious illustrator and his first publication, published when he was 19, was Illustrations of the Family of Psittacidae, or Parrots in 1830. His paintings were well received and he was favourably compared with Audubon. Throughout his life he continued to paint seriously. He had a lifelong ambition to illustrate Tennyson's poems; near the end of his life a volume with a small number of illustrations was published, but his vision for the work was never realized. Lear briefly gave drawing lessons to Queen Victoria, leading to some awkward incidents when he failed to observe proper court protocol

Largely self-educated, idiosyncratically if brilliantly talented, Lear was not a healthy man. From the age of six he suffered frequent grand mal epileptic seizures, and bronchitis, asthma, and in later life, partial blindness. Lear experienced his first seizure at a fair near Highgate with his father. The event scared and embarrassed him. Lear felt lifelong guilt and shame for his epileptic condition. His adult diaries indicate that he always sensed the onset of a seizure in time to remove himself from public view. How Lear was able to anticipate them is not known, but many people with epilepsy report a ringing in their ears or an "aura" before the onset of a seizure. In Lear's time epilepsy was believed to be associated with demonic possession, which contributed to his feelings of guilt and loneliness. When Lear was about seven he began to show signs of depression, possibly due to the constant instability of his childhood. He suffered from periods of severe depression which he referred to as "the Morbids."

In 1846 Lear published A Book of Nonsense, a volume of limericks that went through three editions and helped popularize the form. In 1865 The History of the Seven Families of the Lake Pipple-Popple was published, and in 1867 his most famous piece of nonsense, The Owl and the Pussycat, which he wrote for the children of his patron Edward Stanley, 13th Earl of Derby. Many other works followed.

Lear's nonsense books were quite popular during his lifetime, but a rumour circulated that "Edward Lear" was merely a pseudonym, and the books' true author was the man to whom Lear had dedicated the works, his patron the Earl of Derby. Supporters of this rumour offered as evidence the facts that both men were named Edward, and that "Lear" is an anagram of "Earl".

Source : http://en.wikipedia.org

Stories

The Story of the Four Little Children Who Went Round the World

The History of the Seven Families of the Lake Pipple-popple

Nonsense Cookery

 

Songs

 

Calico Pie

The Duck and the Kangaroo

The Jumblies

The Nutcrackers and the Sugar-Tongs

The Owl and the Pussycat

The Daddy Long-legs and the Fly

The Broom, the Shovel, the Poker and the Tongs

Mr. and Mrs. Spikky Sparrow

The Table and the Chair

 

 

Poems

 

When 'Grand Old Men' Persist in Folly

DINGLE BANK

Epitaph

His Garden

How pleasant to know Mr. Lear

Incidents in the Life of my Uncle Arly

SPOTS OF GREECE

The Akond of Swat

The Courtship of the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo

The Dong with a Luminous Nose

The Pobble Who Has No Toes

The Quangle Wangle's Hat

THE YOUTHFUL COVE

 

 

Lymerics

 

There was a Young Girl of Majorca

There was a Young Lady of Bute

There was a Young Lady of Clare

There was a young Lady of Dorking

There was a Young Lady of Hull

There was a Young Lady of Lucca

There was a Young Lady of Norway

There was a Young Lady of Parma

There was a Young Lady of Poole

There was a Young lady of Portugal

There was a Young Lady of Russia

There was a Young Lady of Ryde

There was a Young Lady of Sweden

There was a Young Lady of Troy

There was a Young Lady of Turkey

There was a Young Lady of Tyre

There was a Young Lady of Wales

There was a Young Lady of Welling

There was a Young Lady whose bonnet

There was a Young Lady whose chin

There was a Young Lady whose eyes

There was a Young Lady whose nose

There was a Young person of Crete

There was a Young Person of Smyrna

There was an Old Derry down Derry

There was an Old Lady of Chertsey

There was an Old Lady of Prague

There was an Old Lady whose folly

There was an Old Man at a casement

There was an Old Man in a boat

There was an Old Man in a pew

There was an Old Man in a tree

There was an Old Man of Aosta

There was an Old Man of Apulia

There was an Old Man of Berlin

There was an old Man of Bohemia

There was an Old Man of Calcutta

There was an Old Man of Cape Horn

There was an Old Man of Coblenz

There was an Old Man of Columbia

There was an Old Man of Corfu

There was an Old Man of Dundee

There was an Old Man of Jamaica

There was an Old Man of Kamschatka

There was an Old Man of Kilkenny

There was an Old Man of Leghorn

There was an Old Man of Madras

There was an Old Man of Marseilles

There was an Old Man of Melrose

There was an Old Man of Moldavia

There was an Old Man of Peru

There was an Old Man of Quebec

There was an old Man of th' Abruzzi

There was an Old Man of the Cape

There was an Old Man of the Coast

There was an Old Man of the Dee

There was an Old Man of the East

There was an Old Man of the Hague

There was an Old Man of the Isles

There was an Old Man of the Nile

There was an Old Man of the North

There was an Old Man of the South

There was an Old Man of the West

There was an Old Man of the West-2

There was an Old Man of the Wrekin

There was an Old Man of Thermopyle

There was an Old Man of Vesuvius

There was an Old Man of Vienna

There was an Old Man of Whitehaven

There was an Old Man on a hill

There was an Old Man on some rocks

There was an Old Man on the Border

There was an Old Man or Nepaul

There was an Old Man who said How

There was an Old Man who said Hush

There was an Old Man who supposed

There was an Old Man with a Beard

There was an Old Man with a beard-2

There was an Old Man with a flute

There was an Old Man with a gong

There was an Old Man with a nose

There was an Old Man with a poker

There was an Old Man with an owl

There was an Old Man, on whose nose

There was an Old Man, who said Well

There was an Old Person of Anerley

There was an Old Person of Bangor

There was an Old Person of Basing

There was an Old Person of Buda

There was an old Person of Burton

There was an Old Person of Cadiz

There was an Old Person of Cheadle

There was an old Person of Chester

There was an Old Person of Chili

There was an Old Person of Cromer

There was an old person of Dover

There was an old person of Dutton

There was an Old Person of Ems

There was an Old Person of Ewell

There was an Old Person of Gretna

There was an Old Person of Hurst

There was an Old Person of Ischia

There was an Old Person of Leeds

There was an Old Person of Mold

There was an Old Person of Nice

There was an Old Person of Philae

There was an Old Person of Prague

There was an Old Person of Rheims

There was an Old Person of Rhodes

There was an Old Person of Spain

There was an Old Person of Sparta

There was an Old Person of Tartary

There was an Old Person of Tring

There was an Old Person of Troy

There was an Old Person whose habits

There was an Young Lady of Bute

There was an Young Lady of Portugal

There was an Young Lady of Ryde

There was an Young Lady whose bonnet

There was an Young Lady whose chin

There was an Young Person of Smyrna

 

 

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